Susannah Baker

Monthly Archives : October 2017

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When You Need God to Clean Up Your Mess

On October 24, 2017, Posted by , in Encouragement, With 3 Comments

Last week, my friend, Christine Scott, leaned over to me before Biblestudy began and said, “Hey – every time I pray for you, I keep hearing God say, ‘I got your messy.’  I don’t know if that means anything to you, but that’s what I keep hearing and praying.  God’s got your mess and messiness in life, whatever that may be.”

“Who, moi?!” was my first internal response.  Thanks, but no messes to clean up here at the moment.  Doing pretty well for the first time in weeks, to be honest.  I GOT THIS.

Beware of EVER thinking that.  Because it wasn’t just a few hours later that the mess hit the fan.

Mess created from running too fast, going too hard, thinking, “I got this,” while inconsiderately leaving other people in the dust.

The first day after my “messy” was exposed, I was too embarrassed to even talk about it to God.  I was hiding underneath the labels of “Terrible Parent,” “Terrible Friend,” “Terrible Everything” that I had stuck on myself and assumed God agreed with.

But after a few days of hiding underneath the mess and avoiding intimacy with God, I decided to invite Him into the mess.  And instead of a lecture or a talking-to about my overall failures as a human being, what I found was…grace.  God not only had my mess, He was down on all-fours cleaning up the mess on my behalf.

I love FB Meyer’s quote from Love to the Uttermost that says, “Again, He stoops from the throne, and girds Himself with a towel, and in all lowliness, endeavors to remove from thee and me the stain which His love dare not pass over.  He never loses the print of the nail; He never forgets Calvary and the blood; He never spends one hour without stopping to do the most menial work of cleansing filthy souls.  And it is because of this humility He sits on the Throne and wields the scepter over hearts and world.”

I don’t know what your mess looks like today.  It might be a stack of dishes in the sink that have overflowed onto the counter.  Or it might be a house full of kids who need you to deal with their messes of every second of the day.  It might be a marriage that looks more like a train wreck than the picture of peaceful bliss.  Or it might be a ruined friendship or a ruined day or a ruined life that feels frayed around the edges or unraveling at the seams.

But whatever your mess is, not only does God got your mess, God’s got you.  That’s what real grace is for.  It’s for real sinner, not respectable sinners.  It’s for real messes, not just overflowing piles.  So hear God say over you today, “I got this.  I got you.  I got your messy.  That’s what Calvary was for.  And that’s what grace is for.  For each and every mess.  For each and every day.  For each and every life.”

David says it best when in Psalm 32 he writes, “When I kept silent about my sin, my body wasted away through my groaning all day long…I acknowledged by sin to You, and my iniquity I did not hide; I said, ‘I will confess my transgressions to the Lord; and You forgave the guilt of my sin.  Therefore, let everyone who is godly pray to You in a time when You may be found.  Surely in a flood of great waters they shall not reach him.  You are my hiding place; You preserve me from trouble; You surround me with songs of deliverance” (Psalm 32:3, 5-6).  

Confess your mess, receive God’s grace, and hear His songs of deliverance.  Because of Jesus, He’s already got your mess covered, every single time.

Remembering With Rejoicing

On October 17, 2017, Posted by , in Kathy, With 3 Comments

None of us were sure what October 11th would look like.

We didn’t know if it would be a day of mourning or a day of rejoicing.

It turns out that it was a little of both.

It turns out that when the year anniversary arrives of the death of someone you love and know is with Jesus, there are tears and laughter intertwined.  And I think all of us who knew and loved Kathy McDaniel were relieved to discover that.

We were relieved that in the midst of our tears, there was joy in the remembering.

I went to bed last Tuesday evening a little tentative.  I learned last year in the weeks and months leading up to and following Kathy’s death that grief does strange things to the heart that translate to the body, like it or not.  Like it or not, there were days, or even weeks, it felt like I was walking with lead bricks on my feet or had a weary sorrow pressing on my heart.  And I did not know if I would wake up the morning of the 11th with those same concrete bricks on my heart or feet.

But as I climbed into bed, the the word “Rejoice!” popped into my head, a word I had not thought of in a long time.  It was almost as if I heard Kathy herself say it.

“Rejoice!” was Kathy’s word; she wore it on a chain around her neck and signed it at the end of many of her letters.  And “Rejoice” was her word because joy was the attitude of her heart – joy and steadfast courage in the face of the enemy of cancer, an enemy that ended up taking her body, but not her heart.

And hearing her voice say “Rejoice!” as I climbed into bed was a precious reminder that Kathy Bonds McDaniel was alive and well.  Yes, we were about to climb the hurdle of the day of her death the next day, but the day of her death was also the day of her becoming.  The day of her wedding.  The day of her face to face encounter with her Heavenly Groom, Jesus, the Lover of her soul.  The battle Kathy fought so well with cancer had worked out for her an eternal weight of glory that she was in the throes of enjoying, in fact, rejoicing in, while we were missing her on this earth.

When I got up the next morning, I read from the devotional book The Songs of Jesus by Tim Keller.  The reading for the day came from Psalm 108:1-4: “My heart, O God, is steadfast; I will sing and make music with all my soul.  Awake, harp and lyre!  I will awaken the dawn.  I will praise you, O Lord, among the nations; I will sing of you among the peoples.  For great is your love, higher than the heavens; your faithfulness reaches to the skies.”

The devotional from Keller said this about the psalm: “This psalm is an expression of a ‘steadfast’ heart, one with courage.  There is an aggressive joy here.  Even if it is dark, the psalmist’s song to God will bring on the dawn.”

My friends, can I tell you something?  Kathy McDaniels’s aggressive joy and steadfast heart literally brought on the dawn.  She brought on the dawn by showing all of us who watched her suffer and die, leaving behind a husband and three young children, the character of Christ in the midst of every single trial she walked through.

She brought on the dawn by modeling for us that joy and rejoicing was possible in the face of extreme affliction.

And she was bringing on the dawn the morning of October 11th, singing her song of joy and confidence with Jesus over those of us here, reminding us that joy and rejoicing is coming for us too when Jesus comes to take us home.

Were there tears throughout the day of October 11th?  Yes.  Of course.  But they were tears, in the words of Rich Mullins’ song If I Stand, “If I weep, let it be as man who is longing for his home.”  They were tears of longing for home – the home Kathy stands so fully and completely in now and the home that we get only glimpses of when the veil is pulled back for a moment and we hear her songs on the other side.

My friend, Jenny Venghaus, said it best.  As a few of us sat together last Tuesday, talking about and remembering Kathy, she said, “It’s like she left the wedding reception and got to go on the honeymoon, and we are all still here cleaning up afterwards, waiting for our turn to go too.”

Amen.

But friends, one day, for those who know King Jesus, our reception is coming too.  So until that day, we are to sing, like Kathy, with aggressive joy and steadfast hearts to awaken the dawn.  The dawn is a reminder to a dark and weary world that rejoicing is coming, the sun is rising, and glory is breaking to fill our eyes.

We ended the day at the McDaniels’ house eating ice cream sundaes with sprinkles, gummy worms, and chocolate sauce – because, after all, what is a day of rejoicing without a little ice cream at the end?

That’s just the way Kathy would have wanted it.

So “Rejoice”! The way is hard, but the joy is deep.  All you have to do is open your eyes, look for the dawn, and sing with aggressive joy.  The Son is coming.

Finding a Friend

On October 10, 2017, Posted by , in Motherhood, Surviving School, With 1 Comment

Several weeks ago was the first week of fifth grade, or middle school, for my oldest daughter, Lillian.

She got into the car quiet as a mouse when I picked her up at the end of her first day, and little by little, as the evening wore on, she began to share about the events of the day and what had made her so quiet in the car.

Turns out she felt at the end of the day like so many of us remember feeling at the end of a day of middle school – a little unnoticed, a little faded into the background, a little like an old piece on a patchwork quilt.  Part of that feeling was a result of her quiet personality, and part of that feeling was just what goes along with the territory of middle school. She faded into the background at lunch, she faded into the background in class, and overall, she ended the day feeling…alone.  Even though she was surrounded by 64 classmates.

All summer (and let’s be honest, pretty much for all their lives) I’ve been praying for that “one friend” for my daughters…all four of them.  Because let’s face it, with four girls to raise, what else does one pray about at this phase of life besides friendships, sassy backtalk, and emotional drama?

If you’re a woman, when you hear the phrase “one friend,” you know who I’m talking about.  That “one friend” who saves you a seat at her lunch table come hell or high water.  That “one friend” who chooses you in class, no matter who the new girl or the cool girl is.  That “one friend” who invites you over on a Friday night, even if the most exciting thing you are going to do is sleep on her family’s pullout couch and watch a Fred Astaire musical…again.

I had a friend like that.  And she was a best friend in every sense of the word.  She was the cool kid and let’s just say I was…not.  But she always choose me.  And next to her I always felt like my place was secure.  And if I wasn’t picked on a Friday night by anyone else, it was ok, because I knew I would always be picked by her.

And that’s who I’ve been praying for for my girls.  And if we are honest, I think a lot of mommas pray that for their girls.  Because for some reason, we think our daughters can endure and weather anything as long as they have that “one friend.”

So last week when I began to pray my “one friend” prayer for my daughters once again, the Lord quietly responded with a simple statement in my heart: “You might be praying the wrong prayer.”

And immediately the words of Ephesians 3:17-19 came to mind: “And I pray that you, being rooted and established in love, may have power, together with all the Lord’s holy people, to grasp how wide and long and high and deep is the love of Christ, and to know this love that surpasses knowledge – that you may be filled to the measure of all the fullness of God.”

Pause.

Apparently, being filled up with all the fullness of God, being rooted and grounded in His unchanging love, experiencing the height and depth, the length and width of a crucified Christ has nothing to do with having that “one friend.”

This was news to my heart.  Not to my head – I’ve known these verses, memorized these verses, prayed these verses for years.  But this time, the scripture translated to my heart.

My prayer for my daughters does not need to be, “O God, give them just one friend.”  My prayer needs to be, “O God, no matter what happens in my daughters’ day, fill them up with all the fullness of Christ.  Let them be so rooted and grounded in Your love, that no matter what happens, the knowledge of Your love, the knowledge that You are with them and always choose them and love to be with them, trumps any knowledge of despair, fear, shame, rejection, embarrassment, or sadness they might feel.  Lord, would You please be their One Friend?”

And I am telling you, my heart flooded with peace when I prayed that prayer.  Because that way, the pressure is off people.  It’s off that “one friend” or any friend for that matter to perform in a way that communicates unconditional love and acceptance.  And that pressure is transferred to God.  And I can count on Him as a mom of four daughters to love each and every one of them through every situation.  I can count on Him to choose them every single time.  I can lean on Him to provide in their hearts what no human heart can ever provide – the rooting and grounding nature of the unchanging nature of the love of Christ.

And that gives this momma’s heart peace.

I had to repent for the lenses I had been wearing and the expectations I had been placing on other people – fifth, third, and first grade people for that matter! – to be something to my girls no one could ever be except the Lord.  And I have been praying that prayer consistently ever since the Lord deposited it in my heart.

I don’t know what your prayers for your child or children have been over the summer or fall, and I don’t know what your expectations are when it comes to friends.  But I can tell you this, you and I both will be disappointed if we are waiting on that “one friend,” for our children, or even for ourselves.  Because what I am finding is that my daughter’s middle school feelings have the ability to pull up my own middle school feelings from years ago and make my feel like a fifth grader at a lunch table all over again.  And even as a forty-year-old, I have found myself praying that “one friend” prayer, hoping a human can deliver for me what only God can provide.

Because at some point, as an eleven-year-old or as a forty-year-old, the expectation of a “one friend” is going to fail you.  And what I am learning is that God designed it that way for a purpose.

Because how else in the world would we ever come to know and experience the love that never fails us if we could find it in a fifth grade classroom or at a forty-year-old lunch table?  And maybe that’s what the Lord wants to teach you and me and our children this school year.  Stop asking for the things that can’t help but let you down, and start asking for the one love, the one friend, that hung on a cross so that He could lift you to Himself and never let you down.  He truly is your Perfect Friend.

Some of you may have read this post last week, only to find it disappear from my blog site – I apologize for that error!  Last week’s post was meant to be Top Ten Things I Learned from a Hurricane, and this week’s post was supposed to be today’s, Finding a Friend.  I am trusting the timing on when it was read – last week or this week – was sovereignly ordained for each and every heart.  As always, thank you for being patient with me and all my technological errors!

Trusting the One Friend who never fails,

Susannah 

Top Ten Things I Learned from a Hurricane

On October 2, 2017, Posted by , in Uncategorized, With 3 Comments

It’s been five weeks since Hurricane Harvey hit Houston, and we are all starting to breathe just a little bit again.  Wherever we all are – back in our own houses or still in temporary housing – some of our breaths might still be short gasps for air, but there have been a few moments of genuine exhale and learning how to live again.

But I don’t think many of us will ever live the same.  At least I hope we don’t ever live the same.  Harvey changed our city and changed us as individuals, and I wanted to take time to reflect on some of the lessons we have learned, are learning, and hopefully will continue to learn in the days and years ahead.

1.  “Before Houston can be Houston Strong, we must be Houston Humble.”

The pastor of our church, Gregg Matte, has said this phrase since his first Sunday back in the pulpit after the hurricane hit.  And he is so right.  Houston must be humble enough to hear what God is saying to us, as a city, as individuals, in the rubble before the rebuilding.  Because, as Jesus Himself said (and this is my paraphrase here), “What good is it if a person, or a city, gains the whole world, rebuilds their whole city, becomes strong by their own arms and the sweat of their own brow, yet loses their souls?(Matthew 16:26)  God alone knows how He wants to rebuild our city to save our city, so before we put one brick on top of another, we must humble our hearts before Him and genuinely ask Him what He wants to say, how He wants us to change, and what He wants us to do.

2.  When given the opportunity, the church in Houston really can become the church.

When given the opportunity, the church in Houston didn’t just read their Bibles, they did our Bibles, in the rain, in boats, in the tear outs and in the tear downs.  The stories and examples are endless, absolutely endless, but the one that gets to me the most happened at my friend Sally Henry’s house.  I’ve known Sally since I was in junior high (she was my junior high youth director at church), and her house flooded along with so many others in her neighborhood.  She had standing water in her house for nine days, so when the waters finally receded, a crew was needed to get in there quickly to get sheet rock, floors, and everything single thing she owned out to keep mold from spreading anymore than it already had.

I figured anyone who put up with me in junior high deserved a helping hand in the biggest sort of way, so Jason gathered a network of about fifteen men who descended on Sally’s house on a Friday morning.  And by Friday afternoon, all the work in Sally’s house was done.  But with the exception of my husband, Jason, not a single one of those men knew Sally personally.  They just knew she needed help.  The group included business men, construction workers, real estate brokers, Sunday school directors, ex-cons, and ex-atheletes, whose only thing in common was the love of Jesus and a desire to help someone who had lost everything in the flood.

I was standing in the driveway a couple of hours into the job and up walks a friend of ours named Ryan Bishop who heard help was needed at Sally’s house…and that Friday also happened to be Sally’s birthday.  Ryan is married to his beautiful wife, Annette, and has three precious children.  He is a fellow Sunday School teacher at our church, and we usually pass each other with paper in our hands headed to the copier on the fourth floor on a Sunday morning to make copies of our outlines for our respective classes.  But instead of holding papers, this day he was holding flowers.  “I heard it was someone’s birthday today,” he said.  “Which one of you is Sally?”  As Sally raised her hand, Ryan walked up and gave her a big hug along with a beautiful bouquet of flowers.  In the midst of all the ugliness of a house torn apart by a flood, and in a space that looked more like a war zone than a party zone, Ryan brought in a bit of beauty.  And in the sweetness of that moment, watching the church really be the church to one another, I had to keep wiping away tears running under the mask over my face.  Ryan didn’t know Sally.  Sally didn’t know Ryan.  But Ryan was willing to minister deeply and specifically to the needs of Sally’s heart, even the invisible ones, and let the church be the church in a way that was a privilege to witness.

3.  Stuff is just stuff and really isn’t all that important.  

Hurricane Harvey put all of our “stuff” into major perspective.  No one’s stuff was immune to total destruction.  Rich people, poor people, middle class people – people from all walks of life lost their stuff.  No one’s stuff was protected because of how much many they had made in the stock market or had in their bank account.  No one’s stuff was protected because of how famous or influential they where or how many degrees they had.  No one’s stuff was protected because of how good a life they had led.  Everyone’s stuff – rich, poor, white, black, Asian, Hispanic – ended up on the curb  waiting to be hauled off and taken to the trash heap.  Every time I passed another row of houses with loads of mildewed, ruined “stuff” on their lawns, it was a powerful reminder to me and to many others of Jesus’ words: “Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys, and where thieves do not break in or steal; for where your treasure is, there your heart will be also” (Matthew 6:19-21).

4.  Stuff is more than just stuff and really is important.  

I know, I know.  This completely contradicts what I just wrote in point #3.  But this statement is as true as well.  Stuff is more than just stuff because it is attached to meaningful moments and significant memories in people’s lives.  And so much of the stuff that was lost cannot be replaced.  And that is oh.  So.  Hard.  Before the reality of point #3 can happen in many of our hearts,  point #4 has to be acknowledged.  Stuff that is lost has to be grieved over, and we must give ourselves the emotional space and time it requires for memories to be mourned before we can move on to the next stage of rebuilding.

5.  As much as Jesus is with us in the storm, Jesus is with us in the aftermath of the storm.  

I’ve always drawn comfort from hearing the story in the gospels about Jesus being with His disciples in the boat in the middle of the storm (see Mark 4:35-41).  But what I discovered I needed more than the assurance that Jesus was with us in the storm, was that Jesus was with us in all of the wreckage after the storm and would also help us rebuild.

And He was.  Jesus was with us in the wreckage in every house we entered, in every labor of love given for the sake of another, and in every empathetic tear shed and hug given.

My daughter Mia Grace helped me understand this point more than anyone else.

The girls and I took lunch over to a friend’s house that had flooded and we stayed for a while watching a crew rip out her floors.  For the last fifteen years that I have known her, I have always loved going to my friend’s house because every nook and cranny speaks of the warmth and beauty of her creativity and attention to detail.  And one of my favorite creative details of her house is the statue of Jesus that normally stands guard by her front door greeting every guest, reminding everyone of the presence of Immanuel within.

As I set up lunch on my friend’s kitchen counter, I looked outside and saw her statue of Jesus leaning up against her chain link fence, resting among the wreckage of the storm.  Mia Grace was standing beside the statue with a look of awe on her face, and she slowly leaned over and gave Him a kiss.  It was a much needed reminder that Jesus was there, with us, with us in the wreckage, with us in the details after the storm as much as He was with us in the terror of the storm.  Perhaps we would have to look for Him and find Him in different or unusual places, like leaning up against a chain link fence when we would normally expect Him by the front door, but He was there, with us, helping us, loving us, every step of the way.

 

6.  Survivor’s guilt is a very real thing.

Those of us who escaped from our homes flooding had to deal with the guilt that came from being spared.  It took days and even weeks to get over the feelings of awkward embarrassment and even guilt when talking to someone whose house did flood.  And through the process of learning how to deal with survivor’s guilt, I found that the only real remedy was recognizing that the gift of margin and time given to me by my house not flooding was there to give to those whose houses did.  And instead of focusing on the guilt, I learned to focus on the grace – the grace that God allowed those of us who had hands to help to truly be a source of help and comfort to those who were in need.

 

7.  Road rage is real.

I’m not exaggerating when I say that the traffic jams that followed Harvey were as stressful as the hurricane itself.  Sitting in the car for three hours to go six miles is enough to make you lose your mind.  The only silver lining I found was that I got to know the other people in the car with me REALLY WELL.  They know things about me that I am pretty sure Jason doesn’t even know. Things like when I get stressed, I start to pick my toe nails…and then throw them out the car window.  Gross, I know.  But what else are you going to do with three hours in a car going at the pace of a snail?!?

8.  Don’t pick up a cat in the pouring rain and try to put it in a boat.  Just.  Don’t.  Do it.

This point has to be my personal favorite.  Some of our friends, Jason and Tiffany Melton and their four beautiful children, had to evacuate from their neighborhood because of the rising waters.  Once Jason got his family to safety, he went back into his neighborhood to help others and ended up in the fight of his life with a cat.  What he didn’t realize until later was that his whole experience was caught on his phone camera…

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As a reward for his feat of bravery by trying to hold onto and save the darn cat, Jason was bitten five times on the hand by the cat and was given the gift of…staph.

So again, I make the point…don’t pick up a cat in the pouring rain and try to put it in a boat.  Just.  Don’t.  Do it.  Let it go.

9.  Dudes were made for hurricanes.  

I am not trying to be a sexist here; I’m just trying to make the point that my husband came alive in a different way than I did in the midst of a full on storm.

Over the course of just two short weeks, Jason got to do more “dude-like” things than in the previous forty-five years of his life.  He (along with many other men in our community) waded in chest deep water and put person after person into boats.

He wound up taking 9-1-1 calls with the Drug Enforcement Agency who was here from Florida while singing, “Bad boys, bad boys, whatcha gonna do, whatcha gonna do when they come for you…” in his head the entire time.

He got to drive a monster truck through flooded streets to shuttle people back and forth to their homes.

And instead of sitting behind a desk or looking for real estate sites in the car, he got to swing a crow bar, rip out flooring, tear out sheet rock, fill and re-fill wheelbarrows, and sweat to his
heart’s content.  It made going back to work three weeks after the hurricane feel more than a little mundane.  I fully expected to get a call from him his first week back saying, “Babe, I’m headed to Florida to join the DEA.”

Like I said, dudes were made for hurricanes.

10.  For there to be a Red Sea Road, there must be also be a Red Sea.  

A week before Hurricane Harvey hit, I was reading the passage in Isaiah 11 that says,

“And the Lord will utterly destroy
    the tongue of the Sea of Egypt,
and will wave his hand over the River
    with his scorching breath,
and strike it into seven channels,
    and he will lead people across in sandals.
And there will be a highway from Assyria
    for the remnant that remains of his people,
as there was for Israel
    when they came up from the land of Egypt.” (Isaiah 11:15-16)

In the book of Exodus, when the Israelites fled from the Egyptians, Pharaoh and his army pursued them on chariots and horses to try to bring them back to Egypt as slaves (Exodus 14).  The Israelites walked as far as they could on their own two feet, and then hit the barrier of the Red Sea.  Addressing his people’s panic as they watched Pharaoh’s chariots come closer and closer, Moses said, “Fear not, stand firm, and see the salvation of the Lord, which he will work for you today. For the Egyptians whom you see today, you shall never see again. The Lord will fight for you, and you have only to be silent” (Exodus 14:13-14).

Under God’s command, as Moses’ lifted his staff and stretched out his hand over the Red Sea, the waters parted, and the Israelites crossed to the other side on dry land.  Once the Israelites had passed through to safety on the Red Sea Road, the waters came crashing down on Pharaoh and his army, and the horses and chariots went tumbling into the sea.

This passage in Isaiah 11 is remembering the Red Sea Road of deliverance God made for His people and is looking ahead to a “greater, worldwide Exodus” when Isaiah foresees the sea itself being dried up and God gathering once and for all all of His people to Himself (Alec Motyer, Isaiah By the Day).

In my journal, I wrote this about Isaiah 11:15-16: “To have a Red Sea Road, you must have a Red Sea barrier.  You must be backed into a corner with an enemy breathing down your neck and no way forward.  You have to experience the pain of the press to know the healing and wonder of redemption.  I forget that so much of the time.  I want the miracles of the Red Sea road without the pain and press of the Red Sea barriers.”

God used that passage to prepare my heart for the hurricane ahead, for so much of the time, I cry out to God to show me His power, to show me His deliverance, and to make a way through the Red Sea, forgetting all the while that means I must be backed into a corner with absolutely no way forward but Him.

In the last few weeks, Exodus 14 and Isaiah 11 have given me confidence and courage to believe that when we find ourselves in the pain and press of needing deliverance with absolutely no human way forward, no money in our bank account, no funds to cover the costs, no more energy to manage the needs, no resources to fight the fight, then, and only then, is when we see God’s hand of deliverance lifted high over our lives, over our needs, over our city, and He parts the waters, and makes a way with a Red Sea road.

The Red Sea barrier of Hurricane Harvey was terrible and took us all to a place of needing deliverance in ways most of us have never experienced before.  But it also gave us the privilege of seeing God’s hand part the waters around us and make Red Sea roads for His people in ways we would have never seen without the hurricane.

Hurricane Harvey taught all of us in Houston so many things that matter; I just hope that they are things that remain.  Things that help us to refocus and reorganize our priorities, our pocketbooks, our to-do lists and agendas for each and every day.  And I hope that it helps us remember that for every Red Sea barrier that blocks our way forward in the future, we have a Deliverer who promises to make a Red Sea road for His people every single time, no matter the size of the sea.